SHARE
POST




Five Things to Keep in Mind for Successful Sales on Trains

To successfully sell snacks and drinks on board a train, you need products that appeal to as many passengers as possible so that they will purchase them. But what are the things to remember when presenting and placing products to maximize your sales?

Here are five points that contribute to on-board retail success:

  1. Products must be clearly visible.
    Peter Coelho Train Services LSG Group

    Peter Rebelo Coelho heads up the Train segment at the LSG Group in Europe

    Passengers will only be tempted to buy things they can see. Most people will not go through the bother of asking the service crew if they have this or that product on board.

  2. Products must be easy to pick up.
    The service crew want to serve snacks and drinks to as many passengers as possible. Valuable selling time is lost if products cannot be grabbed and handed over easily.
  3. Products must not be crumpled or damaged.
    Nobody wants crushed crisps! So when positioning products, it is important to think about their contents as well. Crisps and cakes should never be squashed together if they are to be in perfect condition when served to passengers.
  4. Products must have specific positions.
    Savory items should always be here and sweet items there. That’s how passengers can see everything on offer at a glance. When products have specific positions, regular travelers can immediately tell whether the product they are interested in is still available. Additionally, the service crew can quickly replenish individual items.
  5. Swapping products must be easy.
    A train travels from A to B in the morning and then from B to A again in the afternoon or evening. Ideally, different products should be offered at different times of the day. For the service crew, this means that they must be able to swap out individual products quickly and simply.

At the LSG Group, we have experts in presentation who determine the ideal positions and quantities needed to achieve on-board retail success when assortments change or we acquire new customers. My colleagues combine skill, logic and strategy like they are playing the Tetris video game.
Of course, the products chosen and the distribution channel must be right, and the service crew must be properly trained and motivated. Getting the presentation right is not enough to achieve sales success on board trains, but it is a key element and a skill that must be acquired.

Best regards,
Peter Coelho

COMMENTS